Consequences of teen dating violence

Working with Young Survivors Young people often face obstacles in accessing dating abuse services, but a knowledgeable service provider can help overcome those obstacles and ensure a young survivor's safety.

These resources from Break the Cycle offer an introduction to some of the challenges that youth and service providers face.

The CDC defines teen dating violence as "physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking" [1]. almost 1.5 million high school students experience physical abuse from a partner every year?

Get Help for Someone Else This comprehensive guide from Loveisrespect is directed toward friends, family, and others who want to assist a person in an abusive relationship.

Dating Violence Prevention, Teens Ages 13 to 19 Years The New York State Department of Health provides an overview and links to state and national resources.

Teaching Young People about Consent (PDF) In this article from ACT for Youth, Elizabeth Schroeder discusses the need to talk about consent with youth "early and often," and offers tips for educating children and youth on the topic.

SEL Toolkit: Relationship Skills This section of ACT for Youth's Social and Emotional Learning Toolkit links to strategies and resources that will help youth work professionals teach relationship skills.

Learn about Dating Violence Offered by Break the Cycle, this collection of web pages explains warning signs of dating violence and what legal protections, academic research, and other resources are available.

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