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[After several poor analog-to-CD transfers in the ’80s and ’90s, Whipped Cream & Other Delights was reissued as part of Shout!

Factory’s Herb Alpert Signature Series and boasts remarkably improved sound.] Original Release Date: 1965 Re-issue Date: 2015 Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass were rolling right down the middle of the American pop scene like a locomotive in 1966 — and this album captures them at the peak of their exuberance.

Ostensibly, the personnel wasn’t a primary consideration as Alpert and company had already begun making serious inroads on the pop music scene.

Not bad, considering the market was being heavily infiltrated, if not practically dominated by the British Invasion.

Original Release Date: 1966 Re-issue Date: 2015 By late 1966, it seemed as if every TV commercial and every pop arranger had latched onto the Herb Alpert “Ameriachi” sound — at which point the resourceful originator of that sound began to pare it down and loosen it up a bit. Indeed, two of the album’s three hit singles, “The Work Song” and “Flamingo,” are jazz tunes — the former nervous and driving, the latter joyously kicking — and the third, “Mame,” gets a nifty Dixieland treatment a la Louis Armstrong, with Alpert singing one verse. only went to number two on the LP charts, Alpert’s creativity and popularity were still peaking. O., Sounds Like does preserve the feeling, particularly in the extended vamps on an updated slave song, “Wade in the Water” (a hit single).

The sleeping gem of the record is guitarist John Pisano’s “Freight Train Joe,” a wistfully evocative tune that won’t quit the memory, and the mournful Alpert/Pisano/Nick Ceroli tune “For Carlos” later became Wes Montgomery’s “Wind Song.” Though S. Original Release Date: 1967 Re-issue Date: 2015 For one week in June 1967, Sounds Like was able to break the Monkees‘ 31-week hammerlock on the number one slot on the charts — just two weeks before the Beatles‘ Sgt. This shows, lest you forget — and many have — just how popular Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass were, still spanning the generations during the Summer of Love, still putting out records as fresh and musical and downright joyous as this one. “Gotta Lotta Livin’ to Do” settles you into the record with nothing but a long vamp — a daring production decision.

Rather, it could be heard as bachelorettes were being introduced on ABC-TV’s The Dating Game.

Original Release Date: 1966 Re-issue Date: 2015 With this album, Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass settle into their hitmaking groove, the once strikingly eclectic elements of Dixieland, pop, rock, and mariachi becoming more smoothly integrated within Alpert‘s infectious “Ameriachi” blend.

If the regal “El Presidente” sounds particularly familiar, it may well be due to Alpert‘s slight renovation of the “Winds of Barcelona” from the Tijuana Brass‘ previous effort, the less than impressive Herb Alpert’s Tijuana Brass, Vol. It was renamed “El Presidente,” presumably to honor the then-recent memory of the slain U. Because there was enough demand for live dates, just like a musical Gepetto, Alpert formed a real Tijuana Brass.

The bandleader/trumpeter was joined by Tonni Kalash (trumpet), Robert Edmondson (trombone), Pat Senatore (bass), John Pisano (guitars), Lou Pagani (piano), and Nick Ceroli (drums).

The recent Old Navy "Dating Game" commercials have me wondering if the music other than Spanish Flea on the show was the Tijuana Brass or a band that sounds similliar to them.

Original Release Date: 1962 Re-issue Date: 2015 The colossus that is A&M Records starts right here with the first album by the 1960s instrumental juggernaut known as the Tijuana Brass.

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